Wednesday, 12 February 2014

endings and beginnings




The summer garden is drawing to a close. We are harvesting what we can, getting ready to plant again for the new season. It is still terribly hot here, and I find myself at this time of year longing for the shift that comes with autumn.

It's always a slow change in our part of the world. Usually it's March before it starts to creep in at the corners of the day. It's subtle at first, only noticeable early in the morning and at dusk when the stifling heat becomes more pleasant. Then one day, the evening will feel crisp and you'll find yourself looking for a jumper and thinking about lighting the fire.

The heat in the middle of the day can still linger on for many more months, even into winter. But that shift, it's enough to make a huge impact on the garden. We can think again about peas and brassicas. Leafy greens become much easier to grow, staying sweet and swelling to size, unlike the hot summer months when they are lean, bitter and bolt to seed soon after planting. The chillies will continue to grow right through depending on whether we get frosts over winter.

The shady places in the garden, which are favoured in summer, are no longer preferred. Full sunshine is needed over the colder months, although some things will still grow in the shaded pockets. English spinach and a few greens managed in full shade throughout winter last year. I'll be experimenting with a few new things this cold season as well. I don't think there will ever be a time that the garden won't be teaching me something new.






It's a wonderful time in the garden. Full of the promise of the season ahead, while still enjoying the bounty of summer's labour. The summer clean up is always the busiest time, but it's like having a storm before the calm. With the cooler weather, the bugs and critters will decrease, the growing of the plants will slow to a more reasonable pace and you can really relax into the gardening. This is really the start of our growing year and I can't wait.

What's going on in your garden? Are you just thinking about planting again? Or is your garden still in full swing?

8 comments:

  1. Those carrots look amazing. I've never had any luck with them growing straight. Regards Kathy A, Brisbane

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    1. Doesn't matter how they look Kathy! Homegrown carrots are great.

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  2. It's amazing we live in an opposite gardening world...while you're ending, we're just begining... as least we're just tailing you:) You have led the way as our garden model:) Love your bounty garden produce photos!

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    1. Thanks Annie. Looking forward to seeing your garden photos :)

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  3. I agree with Kathy, those carrots look amazing, great photo.

    I still need to weed and plan my vegetable garden, I like how you have the raised garden beds. My vegetable garden is flat with the ground so I am trying to think how I can frugally come up with raised garden beds. I have the space to play around with the design so I am not really restricted that much. My thinking cap needs to be well and truly on!!

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    1. Raised beds aren't necessary, but they do make things easier for us. We made some for my Dad out of recycled materials that cost nothing. You guys are pretty handy, so perhaps that's an option?

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  4. Such gorgeous photos - my edible garden is confined to two small beds and pots - but this summer I did not plant anything! Need to get back into my garden

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    1. It's always nice to get back out there when the weather cools down a bit! Nothing wrong with growing in pots- you can grow loads of things in them :) Easier to control the weeds as well!

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